How Many Lives Have Coronavirus Vaccines Saved? We Used State Data on Deaths and Vaccination Rates to Find Out

Clinical trials demonstrate how effective vaccines are individually, but the real world shows how effective they are at a population level.

Your Health

15 Minutes With Phyllis Greenberger

Women's health pioneer Phyllis Greenberger's 30-year career was recently honored with the 2021 Perennial Hero Award. We sat down with her to hear more about her impressive accomplishments.

Expert Perspectives

What’s in an At-Home DNA Test?

At-home DNA test kits can give you a general overview on ailments you may be at risk for, but what happens to your sample once you send an at-home DNA test kit to the lab?

Science and Technology

50 Years Ago, the First CT Scan Let Doctors See Inside a Living Skull – Thanks to an Eccentric Engineer at the Beatles’ Record Company

Hounsfield's innovation transformed medicine. He shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1979 and was knighted by the Queen in 1981.

Your Health

What Happens When Your Foot Falls Asleep?

Where do those pins and needles come from?

Your Body

Women Face Motherhood Penalty in STEM Careers Long Before They Actually Become Mothers

Study finds that women in Ph.D STEM programs are often told they have to choose between family and career

Work & Money

Apple Aims to Push More Patient Data to Doctors. But Who Can Gauge Its Impact on Health?

Some doctors appreciate seeing records of home-monitored blood pressure, exercise and the like between visits, others view the data as more of a burden than an asset

Science and Technology

Female Scientists Set Back by the Pandemic May Never Make up Lost Time

During the pandemic, women researchers bore the disproportionate burden of caregiving responsibilities, forcing a drop in their productivity. Research suggests the hit to women's reputations and their scientific impacts may set female scientists back by years, if not decades.

Science and Technology

Designing Less Addictive Opioids, Through Chemistry

One potential way to make opioids less addictive is to make them target injured tissue rather than the healthy brain

Medication Safety

Benjamin Franklin’s Fight Against a Deadly Virus: Colonial America Was Divided Over Smallpox Inoculation, but He Championed Science to Skeptics

The varying responses to a deadly smallpox outbreak 300 years ago provide an eerily prescient object lesson for today's world, similarly devastated by a virus and divided over vaccination

Prevention & Screenings

‘Cheating’s OK for Me, but Not for Thee’ – Inside the Messy Psychology of Sexual Double Standards

Each side is just as likely to play mental gymnastics when it comes to justifying their bad behavior

Sexual Health

What It’s Like to Care for a Child With Severe Eczema

My daughter has severe eczema and life-threatening food allergies. Keeping her safe is a family affair.

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