Garden Frittata

Garden Frittata

This garden frittata's blend of eggs and colorful vegetables makes a deliciously nutritious single-dish meal for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner.

Nutrition & Movement

This blend of eggs and colorful vegetables makes a deliciously nutritious single-dish meal for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner.

Prep Time: 10 Min
Cook Time: 20 Min
Ready In: 30 Min

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

  • 4 large eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 medium unpeeled red potatoes
  • 4 cups Italian kale or other kale variety
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil

Directions:
1. Beat eggs, pepper and salt in large bowl and set aside.
2. Microwave potatoes until slightly soft but not completely cooked, then cube. (Alternate method without microwave: cube potatoes and boil 5 minutes until slightly soft; drain.)
3. While potatoes cool, chop kale, onion and bell pepper. Mix all vegetables together.
4. Heat oil in a 10-inch nonstick skillet. Sauté vegetables for 5-8 minutes. Add to eggs and mix well.
5. Pour egg-vegetable mixture into the same skillet. Cook over low to medium heat until eggs are almost set, about 8-10 minutes.
6. Cover and let sit until eggs are completely set, about 5 minutes. Egg dishes should be cooked to 160°F.

Nutritional Information:
Amount per serving: Calories: 180; Total Fat: 7 g; Saturated Fat: 2 g; Cholesterol: 185 mg; Sodium: 240 mg; Carbohydrate: 22 g; Fiber: 3 g; Protein, 9 g.

Recipe courtesy of "What's Cooking? USDA Mixing Bowl" and the Produce for Better Health Foundation.

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