Homemade Seitan

seitanPrep Time: 10 min
Cook Time: 2 hr
Ready In: 2 hr 10 min


Amount: 4 (1-pound) squares

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups gluten flour (available in health food stores)
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 2/3 cup nutritional yeast
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground sage
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 1/2 cup tamari (a type of soy sauce made without wheat and available in health food stores)

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
2. Line an 8-inch square baking pan with 2-inch-high sides with parchment paper. Lightly oil the parchment paper.
3. Stir the gluten flour, whole wheat flour, nutritional yeast, coriander, sage, ginger and salt in a large bowl to blend.
4. Whisk the water, oil and tamari in another bowl to blend.
5. Quickly stir the tamari mixture into the flour mixture until a very wet dough forms. Transfer the dough to the prepared baking pan and smooth the top. Cover with aluminum foil.
6. Place the pan of seitan dough inside a larger roasting pan. Add enough water to come halfway up the sides of the pan of seitan.
7. Bake for 2 hours, adding more water to the roasting pan if necessary, or until the seitan is firm on top.
8. Cool the seitan to room temperature. Quarter the seitan into 4 equal (1-pound each) squares.

Recipe courtesy of Veria.com, an online extension of the national health and wellness TV network Veria Living.

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