The Two Words That Can Have the Biggest Impact on Your Relationship

Sexual Health

saying thank you


The next time your significant other does something sweet, remember to say “thank you.”

According to an article on YourTango by Rhoberta Shaler, Ph.D, humans have a deep need to be appreciated, and simply saying "thank you" to someone, even for something you feel like they "should've" done anyway, can really help your partner feel that appreciation.

You can never say it enough! Shaler says once you make a point to acknowledge the contributions of your family and partner, keep it up. Once is not enough. Each time they take the trash out, bring you your coffee or extend themselves on your behalf, say those powerful words—"thank you."

There have been more and more studies lately about the power of saying thank you, with one study published in the American Psychological Association's journal Emotion saying:

"When a person's feeling grateful, they're more likely to behave in warm sorts of ways—to be thoughtful, helpful and kind. Research has shown that people who experience more gratitude more deeply and more often—that's linked to a lot of really positive things for people, namely an increase in your own sense of well-being."

Keep those two words in your back pocket and bring ‘em out often. Super simple, super powerful. Thank you!

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