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Beth Battaglino, RN

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Benjamin Franklin once said, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." Wise words and definitely applicable when it comes to speaking of preventive measures to keep chronic health issues at bay.

The good news is there is growing body of research that highlights how healthy lifestyles—good eating habits, regular exercise and routine screenings—can be instrumental in preventing chronic illnesses. And a recent informal HealthyWomen poll shows a widespread awareness of the need for healthy lifestyles, with 62 percent of women polled saying they believe a healthy lifestyle can prevent diseases, such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes.

While we are heartened by these figures, reality paints a starker picture. A recent U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) survey indicates that 30 percent of adults in 12 states are considered obese. And obesity is linked to many serious health problems. So, how do we celebrate the positive strides women have made and encourage them in their quest for better health?

Over the years we've worked with more than 200 medical experts to create the health information on our site, HealthyWomen.org. They ensure medical accuracy and help us provide women the latest health news and research they need to live healthier lives. Whether it's 12 simple ways to fight prediabetes, an overview from Dr. Pamela Peeke on how to prevent gynecologic cancer or our Health Record Keeper app, our goal is to provide accurate, reliable health information that women can use to keep themselves and their families healthy.

The next time the latest CDC statistics are unveiled or you need a medical expert who can explain why belly fat is linked to an increased risk of heart disease, ask us. We’re here to help you locate medical experts, resources or trusted medical content, so feel free to contact us.

With your help, we can support women in their quest to live their healthiest lives.

In good health,
Beth Battaglino