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With Warmer Temps Come More Migraines

Migraine
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As you can probably tell from my previous post, I'm so glad that Spring is on its way. I even saw some daffodils trying to push through the soil in my front yard this morning! But with warmer temperatures, I found out today, comes something I certainly could live without (and if you are a fellow sufferer, so could you).

That something is migraines. I've always suspected an association between warmer temps and the increase in those nasty headaches that make me oh so unhappy.

If you, too, suffer from migraines (as does about 12 percent of the population), you understand. Sometimes I can almost ignore that uncomfortable pain in my head if I keep busy (enough). But other times, well, the pain is so unbearable that even talking is a struggle. And if you are lucky enough not to be plagued by migraines, you probably know someone who is and have witnessed their discomfort and unhappiness for yourself.

Not that it makes me feel any better, but it was interesting to note that researchers have finally found a correlation between weather changes and migraines. They've always suspected the relationship, but now after testing over 7,000 people over seven years, they have proof. Severe headaches were increased by nearly 8 percent with each increase of about 9 degrees Fahrenheit compared to days when the weather was cooler.

So what does this all mean? Maybe you want to stock up on your migraine medications in preparation of the climbing thermometer.

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