Exercise and Blood Pressure

Ask the Expert

Q:

How does exercise affect blood pressure?


A:

Getting enough exercise can improve your blood pressure numbers and help get it under control. A lack of physical activity can be damaging to your health. Why? People who are inactive tend to have higher heart rates (the number of times your heart beats per minute). The higher your heart rate, the harder your heart must work—and the higher your blood pressure can get. Lack of physical activity also increases your risk of being overweight, which can lead to higher blood pressure.

The good news is that every minute counts! It only takes 30 minutes of exercise a day to lower your blood pressure. Exercise doesn't mean you have to run a marathon or swim across the ocean. It can be as simple as parking farther from the store, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, playing actively with your kids or going for a walk around the block after dinner.

Article courtesy of Measure Up/Pressure Down®. Measure Up/Pressure Down is a three-year national campaign created by the American Medical Group Foundation to improve blood pressure control. Learn how to lower your risk and manage the disease with our booklet, Circulation Nation: Your Roadmap to Managing High Blood Pressure.

ADVERTISEMENT

After My Hysterectomy, I’m Living My Best Life

After living with the pain of fibroids for 17 years, treating them was the best gift I could give myself.

Real Women, Real Stories

Nurses and Doctors Sick With COVID Feel Pressured to Get Back to Work

Hospitals, clinics and other health care facilities have flouted that simple guidance, pressuring workers who contract COVID-19 to return to work sooner than public health standards suggest.

Your Care

The Back Surgery Innovation That Gave Me My Life Back

I was stunned and scared when my doctors told me I had suffered a vertebral compression fracture, but this procedure healed me.

Created With Support