What I Learned From Flash Mobs

Why is that when I watch a YouTube video of a flash mob, my eyes well up? Maybe it's because it just makes me so darn happy. I got to thinking, what is it about this impromptu dance party that makes me want to hug the person next to me?

As quoted from Wikipedia, "A flash mob (or flashmob) is a group of people who assemble suddenly in a public place, perform an unusual and sometimes seemingly pointless act for a brief time, then disperse, often for the purposes of entertainment and/or satire." Most often it's a full-out dance routine (yes, like the ones on Glee and Modern Family this past season). For those of you that haven't had the pleasure of seeing one, check it out here and then tell me you weren't smiling the whole time.

When I really thought about what was so joyous about this sudden burst into dance, I realized, it's really about making other people smile, laugh or join in dancing. How many things out there are so purely simple and fun—last I checked, not too many. So these are three lessons I've taken from the flash mob:

1. Spread good news. Instead of sharing the low points of the evening news all the time, why not enlighten your coworker or partner with an uplifting or funny story. Or just smile at a stranger next time you make eye contact. (Find out why optimism is good for your health by clicking here.)

2. Dance. Dancing is a great no-cost or low-cost way to build aerobic fitness, improve balance and strengthen your muscles at any age. And the fun factor really helps you stick with it. P.S. You don't need to have rhythm to enjoy this one!

3. Be proud. How many times do we sit on the sidelines because we're embarrassed to make fools out of ourselves—imagine what we're missing out on! Go ahead … look silly and love it. As Oscar Wilde once said: "Be yourself; everyone else is already taken."


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