Update Your Look With Stylish Eyewear


I've worn eyeglasses for the past 30+ years and always consider my eyewear to be one of my most important accessories. First, because eyeglasses are worn on the face, and second, because I have to wear this accessory every single day–or I cannot see.

I tried contacts several years ago and it was a no go. I just cannot put anything into my eyes. No, no, no—and at my age I'm not about to start trying. I wear progressive lenses and also have bifocal computer eyeglasses (which are well worth the expense for those of you who work or sit in front of a computer many hours a day.)

For the past several years, I've worn Silhouette rimless eyeglasses without hinges which are very light with clip-on shades for sunny days. They hold well when exercising, especially during my downward facing dog in yoga. However, when I was visiting Paris last year, I treated myself to two trendy tortoise-shell frames—one from Jimmy Fairly and one from Paul and Joe. The Parisians know how to style their eyewear and their clothes. The new frames totally changed my look.

Many midlife women start to need reading glasses once they hit their 40s. Corinne McCormack is a boomer girl who designs glasses, so I was curious to interview her about her thoughts on fashion and eyewear for women 50+. Here's what she said:

Judy: What do you think about fashion for women 50+?

Corinne: I don't think your style changes as you age. I think today age is a mindset. I feel as young today as I did in my 30s, and I am physically in better shape! So, why would I change what looks good on me? Of course, there are fashions that just are more juvenile and trendy that don't work for me or anyone in our 50s. But I didn't follow trends or wear baby doll dresses when I was younger either. My philosophy is find something that looks good on you. Then don't worry about the age.

Judy: What about eyewear for women 50+?

Corinne: Eyewear should flatter and compliment your face. I love eyewear because if you find the right shape, you get an automatic uplift! All of my styles are designed to provide that lift that we all love, regardless of your age.

Corinne offered some helpful tips on selecting the correct eyewear for the shape of your face:

Do you have a heart-shaped face?

Do you have an oval-shaped face?

Do you have a round face?

Is your face square shaped?

Makeup artist Rebecca Restrepo shared good advice about makeup under eyewear in the January edition of O, The Oprah Magazine (you can find all the tips in detail at this link):

1. Curl your lashes. (I have to get an eyelash curler. I don't use one.)

2. Use eyeliner along the upper lash line and your waterline, the inner rim of your lower lashes. Dark gray and brown flatter every eye color and are less harsh than black. (OK, Rebecca, now I have to throw out my new Lancome black eyeliner and get a new brown one.) Rebecca says to skip eye shadow—that it won't show under glasses unless you pile it on. ( Sorry, Rebecca, but I disagree. I use Bobbi Brown shadows in shades of cocoa, cement and champagne, which are very subtle colors, and I think they look good.)

3. Apply two coats of volumizing mascara to your top lashes. (I like Lancome Hynose Star mascara in black. It makes my lashes look very long.)

4. Minimize natural darkness with concealer. Rebecca says that eyeglass frames can cast shadows around your eyes. (I use Bobbi Brown Corrector in peach and top it with Smashbox Concealer in 3.0.)

Do you accessorize with eyewear during your life after 50? What type of eyewear do you prefer?

This post originally appeared on aboomerslifeafter50.com.

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