A Simple Method for Setting Intentions and Achieving Happiness

I've never been a fan of resolutions. I'm not sure why. Perhaps it's just the word that turns me off? "Resolution" sounds so, well, final and binding (and something you're doomed to break). Lately, I've given some thought to an alternative word that I've been hearing more lately: Intentions. When we set out with a clear intent on where we want to be in the future—whether it's in one month or one year from now—everything we do moves us in that direction.


I like to think of it in a visual way, so I've mapped it here (see image). Instead of moving along with no clear goals, setting intentions allows all our actions to be directed to a central desire.

So, why not consider where you want to be in the coming months or years? In fact, take out a piece of paper and write it down (it works, really, I've experienced it first hand). Start with one month and then one year, three years, five years, 10 years etc. (you catch my drift). And be bold, don't put limitations on your dreams; that's the beauty of dreams and desires, they are whatever you want them to be. Are you hoping to find a new job, buy a home, purchase your dream car, double your salary, get married, have a child or even just be happier? Set your intentions and put them out in the universe; allow yourself to dream and see where it takes you. You deserve it.

(Note: this post originally appeared in Wellness in Practice last New Year's, but I thought it was worth republishing. Have you made strides towards last year's intentions? Please share below.)

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