cosmetics-729375.jpg
cosmetics-729375.jpg

How Safe are Your Cosmetics? Find Out Now

In one morning hour, it's likely you use a plethora of products: toothpaste, deodorant, shampoo, conditioner, shaving lotion, face wash, body wash, face moisturizer, body moisturizer, and if you wear makeup (which most of us do), add concealer, powder, blush, eyeliner, mascara, eye shadow, lip liner and lipstick to that list. Do you know what's in all of those items?



For most products on today's market, the list of ingredients can be scary, including chemicals that have been linked to cancer, birth defects, learning disabilities and other health problems. This is particularly dangerous for women, since many of these toxic ingredients (including parabens and toluene) are fat-soluble chemicals that are readily absorbed. Fatty breast tissue can be a long-term storage site for some. It's time to get smart about what your slathering on your skin. Check out this cool tool for identifying safe beauty products.

Go to www.cosmeticsdatabase.com and enter the name of your products to find safety ratings. I was shocked to learn about some items that I've used over the years. I actually went into the bathroom and threw out my husband's shaving cream after learning that it scored a 10 on the toxicity scale, meaning it's extremely hazardous (and it was actually a brand that claims to be very natural and always appeared that way to me). So, shop smart. Check your products on the Cosmetic Safety Database and choose wisely.

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