Q:

I've been curious about cleansing fasts since a friend of mine did one last year. A doctor supervised his over a two-week period. Is it necessary to seek a doctor's guidance before starting one of these juicing fasts? What do I need to know to get started?


A:

It is absolutely necessary to seek a physician's help if you plan on doing a cleansing fast. I do not recommend anyone use this method for cleansing or weight loss. There are more negatives to juice fasting than positives, including these potential side effects: hunger, weakness, bad breath, cankers, colds, viruses, blackouts, diarrhea, headaches, nausea, fatigue, insomnia, dehydration, irregular heartbeat and the slowing down of one's metabolic rate.

There's no solid evidence that fasting of any kind removes toxins from the body. Furthermore, fasting for weight loss purposes is merely a temporary fix; once you go off the fast, any weight lost will be regained. People who have diabetes, cancer, kidney disease, liver disease, and who take prescription medications should not fast. Pregnant and nursing women, along with infants and children, should not fast either.

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