Weight Management for Men

Find out if your weight is in a healthy range

man smilingBeing overweight increases your risk for many diseases. If you are overweight, you are more likely to develop health problems, such as heart disease and stroke, the leading causes of death for both men and women in the United States. Overweight people are more likely to have high blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, and high cholesterol, which is also a risk factor. Overweight people are twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes—a major cause of death, heart disease, kidney disease, stroke, amputation and blindness—as people who are not overweight. Several types of cancer are associated with being overweight. Being overweight can also cause sleep apnea—interrupted breathing during sleep; and osteoarthritis—wearing away of the joints. Anyone with risk factors for health problems must be concerned about extra weight.


To determine if you are overweight, normal weight or underweight, your health care professional or you can calculate your body mass index (BMI), which describes body weight relative to height and is strongly correlated with total body fat content in adults.

Your BMI equals your weight in kilograms divided by your height in meters squared. Or you can divide your weight in pounds by your height in inches squared and then multiply by 705. The following chart shows body mass indices for people of various heights and weights. To determine your BMI, find the row that most closely approximates your weight. Read across the row until it crosses the column closest to your height.

(Weight)
(Height)
5'0"
5'3"
5'6"
5'9"
6'0"
6'3"
140
27
25
23
21
19
18
150
29
27
24
22
20
19
160
31
28
26
24
22
20
170
33
30
28
25
23
21
180
35
32
29
27
25
23
190
37
34
31
28
26
24
200
39
36
32
30
27
25
210
41
37
34
31
29
26
220
43
39
36
33
30
28
230
45
41
37
34
31
29
240
47
43
39
36
33
30
250
49
44
40
37
34
31

A man with a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered within the normal, healthy range; 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight; 30 or more is considered obese; and 40 or greater is considered severely obese. An exception would be athletes, who have more muscle mass and less body fat than normal. They might have a BMI as high as 30 and yet not be obese. If your BMI falls under 18.5, you may be underweight; if so, you may want to ask your health care professional to assess your health.

Your health care professional can give you advice about a program suited to your weight and health goals. He or she also may refer you to a nutritionist and/or fitness professional or to a hospital-based weight-management or fitness class to provide guidance while you're getting started.

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