Jolie's Breast Surgery Raises Awareness of Reconstruction Options

angelina jolie


HealthDay News

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News)—Media coverage of actress Angelina Jolie's breast removal and reconstruction improved awareness about breast reconstruction, a new study suggests.

Jolie had both of her breasts removed in 2013 because she has a gene mutation that increased her risk for breast cancer, and then she underwent breast reconstruction surgery.

Researchers conducted online surveys with 1,000 women before and after Jolie went public about her surgeries. After her announcement, 4 percent more women were aware that reconstructive breast surgery is possible after one or both breasts are removed.

In addition, 11 percent more women were aware that breast reconstruction can be done using a woman's own tissue, and 19 percent more were aware that reconstruction can be done during the breast-removal operation.

In the second survey, one-fifth of participants said media coverage about Jolie's surgeries made them "deal more intensively with the topic of breast cancer," according to Dr. David Benjamin Lumenta of the division of plastic, esthetic and reconstructive surgery at the Medical University of Graz, Austria, and colleagues.

Their study was published online Sept. 28 in the journal Cancer.

The findings suggest that media coverage can help improve the public's knowledge about a particular health topic, the researchers said.

SOURCE: Cancer, news release, Sept. 28, 2015

Copyright © 2015 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

ADVERTISEMENT

Black Women Turn to Midwives to Avoid COVID and ‘Feel Cared For’

Fear of the pandemic and historically poor outcomes for Black women giving birth in hospitals is fuelling a demand for home births.

Pregnancy & Postpartum

Menopause Goes Beyond Reproductive Issues

This change of life affects our health from head to toe; it's important to get educated and find the right health care provider.

Menopause & Aging Well

I Didn’t Let Overactive Bladder Stop Me from Living My Life

I remember my overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms starting about three or four years ago. Whenever I would sneeze or cough, I'd urinate a little bit. Then it started to become pretty frequent, which was frustrating, but not yet to the point where it was disrupting my life.

Created With Support