Pregnancy & Your Skin

Pregnancy & Your Skin

Pregnancy & Postpartum

Yippee! You're pregnant. Do you feel the glow yet? No? Well, don't despair over your skin. Acne, dry skin, varicose veins and darkened patches of skin around your eyes, nose and cheeks are common skin-related changes during pregnancy. A dark line may appear down the middle of your abdomen. It's also a common, but harmless, pregnancy-related skin change. To keep your skin healthy follow these simple steps:


  • Wear sunscreen and a hat in the sun. Your skin is more sun-sensitive and may burn more easily during pregnancy.
  • Take your prenatal supplement every day, in addition to eating a well-balanced diet that includes whole grains, fruits and vegetables.
  • Ask your dermatologist or OB about skin care products to control or reduce pregnancy-related skin irritation. Soap substitutes and moisturizers may be recommended.
  • Put your feet up to reduce varicose veins. Report any unusual skin changes such as yellowing of the skin (jaundice), blistering, severe itching, rashes or moles that change in color or size to your health care team.
  • Schedule your healthy pregnancy checkup and childbirth classes.


Sorry to break it to you but, if you've gotten used to your regular Botox injections, glycolic peels and microdermabrasion, it's time to get unused to them. Basically, you should avoid any medically unnecessary procedures or drugs during your pregnancy. And while you may feel those "lunchtime face-lifts" aesthetically necessary, they are definitely not medically necessary. The same goes for teeth whitening and hair coloring.

Want more? For all the Do's and Dont's of pregnancy, download the Pregnancy Planner today!

ADVERTISEMENT

Vaccination against Covid-19 supports a healthy pregnancy by protecting both mother and child – an immunologist explains the maternal immune response

Research during the pandemic has shown that mothers infected with Covid-19 during pregnancy are twice as likely to require ICU care for their newborns, or to lose their children shortly after birth

Your Health

Hypertension Forced Me to Have My Baby Preterm. There Were No Warning Signs.

Being 42 years old, I knew I was at a higher risk for pregnancy complications, but this came out of nowhere and turned my world upside down

Created With Support

Racism a Strong Factor in Black Women’s High Rate of Premature Births, Study Finds

Black women are about 1.6 times as likely as whites to give birth more than three weeks before the due date

Pregnancy & Postpartum

by eMediHealth

☆☆☆☆☆ By eMediHealth ☆☆☆☆☆