Hospital 'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS
Hospital 'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS

Hospital 'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS

Child care experts say it's dangerous for infants to sleep in the same bed with their parents.

Pregnancy & Postpartum

HealthDay News


FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News)—Child care experts say it's dangerous for infants to sleep in the same bed with their parents. Now, researchers report that "baby boxes" and parent education can help reduce the unsafe practice.

Bed-sharing is linked with sleep-related deaths in babies, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and accidental suffocation and strangulation, according to background information with this study.

For the study, researchers at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia recruited more than 2,700 new mothers. Half were instructed face-to-face about safe infant sleep and given a baby box (a cardboard bassinet) with a firm mattress. The other half received only standard nursing discharge instructions with information about safe infant sleep.

The combination of baby box and face-to-face instructions reduced the rate of bed-sharing by 25 percent during infants' first eight days of life, the study found.

For exclusively breast-fed infants—who are at increased risk of bed-sharing—there was a 50 percent reduction in bed-sharing, the researchers said.

"Future studies are needed to determine if the effect of this intervention is sustainable through the first 6 to 12 months of life," said lead investigator Dr. Megan Heere, an assistant professor of pediatrics.

Whether this approach can significantly reduce sleep-related deaths in large populations over time also needs to be evaluated, she said in a Temple news release.

Most mothers who received a baby box said they used the box as a sleeping place for their infants, and 12 percent said the box was the usual sleeping space for their infants.

Among mothers who exclusively breast-fed and also used the box as a sleeping space, 59 percent said the box made breast-feeding easier, according to the study.

The results were presented at the recent Pediatric Academic Societies meeting, in San Francisco. Findings presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

SOURCE: Temple University, news release, May 22, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

ADVERTISEMENT

What Is Family Estrangement? A Relationship Expert Describes the Problem and Research Agenda

Almost 70 million people in the United States report being estranged from a family member

Your Wellness

Hypertension Forced Me to Have My Baby Preterm. There Were No Warning Signs.

Being 42 years old, I knew I was at a higher risk for pregnancy complications, but this came out of nowhere and turned my world upside down

Created With Support

Facebook Has Known for a Year and a Half That Instagram Is Bad for Teens Despite Claiming Otherwise – Here Are the Harms Researchers Have Been Documenting for Years

Studies consistently show that the more often teens use Instagram, the worse their overall well-being, self-esteem, life satisfaction, mood and body image

Your Wellness

by eMediHealth

☆☆☆☆☆ By eMediHealth ☆☆☆☆☆