Your Health by Age
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The foundation of good health is the same no matter your age! Eat healthy, get some movement, prioritize your mental health, keep your checkups with your health care professionals, and avoid unnecessary risks. To get a more detailed list for your age, select your age bracket.

Your 20s

In your 20s, as you embark on greater independence, it's a good time to find a trusted health care provider with whom you can frankly discuss your health care questions and concerns. Menstrual issues, sexually transmitted diseases, contraception and pregnancy may be among your biggest health concerns now. Lifestyle choices focusing on prevention also matter now.

Use the guidelines below, from the Office of Women's Health, to help you live healthier and have a productive conversation at your well-woman visit.

Every day, I will try to incorporate these lifestyle habits:

  • Eat healthy
  • Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity
  • Sleep for at least 7 to 9 hours per night
  • Reach and maintain a healthy weight
  • Get help to quit or not start smoking
  • Limit alcohol use to 1 drink or less
  • Not use illegal drugs or misuse prescription drugs
  • Wear a helmet when riding a bike and wear protective gear for sports
  • Wear a seat belt in cars, and not text and drive
  • Protect my skin in the sun
  • Take 400 to 800 mcg of folic acid
I will talk to my health care provider at least once a year about:
  • Whether I plan to get pregnant in the next year, or the right birth control for me
  • My weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Whether I use tobacco, alcohol, or drugs
  • Any violence in my life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • My family health history, especially of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes
  • Protecting myself from the sun and the hazards of tanning
I will determine whether I'm at higher risk of or need tests, medicines, or vaccines for:
  • Blood pressure
  • Breast cancer prevention medicines
  • Chickenpox
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis A, B, and C
  • HIV
  • HPV
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Meningitis
  • Pap (if 21 or older)
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis
  • Urinary incontinence

Your 30s

Welcome to your 30s! Your body is starting to change bit by bit now, but you may not notice it so obviously yet. Your 30s are a great time to build on a foundation for a lifetime of good health. And it's a good time to make sure you create or complete your family medical history.

Use the guidelines below, from the Office of Women's Health, to help you live healthier and have a productive conversation at your well-woman visit.

Every day, I will try to incorporate these lifestyle habits:

  • Eat healthy
  • Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity
  • Sleep for at least 7 to 9 hours per night
  • Reach and maintain a healthy weight
  • Get help to quit or not start smoking
  • LImit alcohol use to 1 drink or less
  • Not use illegal drugs or misuse prescription drugs
  • Wear a helmet when riding a bike and wear protective gear for sports
  • Wear a seat belt in cars, and not text and drive
  • Protect my skin in the sun
  • Take 400 to 800 mcg of folic acid
I will talk to my health care provider at least once a year about:
  • Whether I plan to get pregnant in the next year or the right birth control for me
  • My weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Whether I use tobacco, alcohol, or drugs
  • Any violence in my life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • My family health history, especially of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes
I will determine whether I'm at higher risk of or need tests, medicines, or vaccines for:
  • Blood pressure
  • Breast cancer prevention medicines
  • Chickenpox
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis A, B, and C
  • HIV
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Meningitis
  • Pap and HPV
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis
  • Urinary incontinence

Your 40s

Welcome to your 40s! This is a time of transition. Your body may be entering perimenopause, the eight to 10 years leading up to menopause. Not only are your hormones changing, your lifestyle may be changing as you care for children and parents. It's important to pay attention to your stress levels and speak up about any physical changes that concern you.

Use the guidelines below, from the Office of Women's Health, to help you live healthier and have a productive conversation at your well-woman visit.

Every day, I will try to incorporate these lifestyle habits:

  • Eat healthy
  • Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity
  • Sleep for at least 7 to 9 hours per night
  • Reach and maintain a healthy weight
  • Get help to quit or not start smoking
  • Limit alcohol use to 1 drink or less
  • Not use illegal drugs or misuse prescription drugs
  • Wear a helmet when riding a bike and wear protective gear for sports
  • Wear a seat belt in cars and not text and drive
  • Protect my skin in the sun
  • Take 400 to 800 mcg of folic acid (for premenopausal women
I will talk to my health care provider at least once a year about:
  • Whether I plan to get pregnant or the right birth control for me (for premenopausal women)
  • Perimenopause symptoms
  • My weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Whether I use tobacco, alcohol, or drugs
  • Any violence in my life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • My family health history, especially my risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes
I will determine whether I'm at higher risk of or need tests, medicines, or vaccines for:
  • Blood pressure
  • Breast cancer prevention medicines
  • Cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis A, B, and C
  • HIV
  • Mammogram
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Meningitis
  • Pap and HPV
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis
  • Urinary incontinence

Your 50s

Many women enjoy this special time of life and feel renewed. You have decades of life experience and may have achieved many of your goals. Giving more time and attention to your health needs is especially important as menopause is getting closer. The average age of menopause for U.S. women is 51.

Use the guidelines below, from the Office of Women's Health, to help you live healthier and have a productive conversation at your well-woman visit.

Every day, I will try to incorporate these lifestyle habits:

  • Eat healthy
  • Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity
  • Sleep for at least 7 to 9 hours per night
  • Reach and maintain a healthy weight
  • Get help to quit or not start smoking
  • Limit alcohol use to 1 drink or less
  • Not use illegal drugs or misuse prescription drugs
  • Wear a helmet when riding a bike and wear protective gear for sports
  • Wear a seat belt in cars and not text and drive
  • Protect my skin in the sun
I will talk to my health care provider at least once a year about:
  • Menopause symptoms
  • My weight, diet, and physical activity level
  • Whether I use tobacco, alcohol, or drugs
  • Any violence in my life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • My family health history, especially my risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes
I will determine whether I'm at higher risk of or need tests, medicines, or vaccines for:
  • Low-dose aspirin
  • Blood pressure
  • Breast cancer prevention medicines
  • Cholesterol
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis A, B, and C
  • HIV
  • Lung cancer (if 55 and older and smoking now or have quit within the last 15 years)
  • Mammogram
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella
  • Meningitis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pap and HPV
  • Shingles
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis
  • Urinary incontinence

Your 60s

Now is the time to embrace aging smart, aging well. With a healthy lifestyle and preventive health care, you can reduce or prevent health problems associated with aging. And don't think it's too late to make lifestyle choices that will boost your health. In addition to your physical health, prioritize your emotional, sexual, and mental health. And get savvy about your health care coverage.

Use the guidelines below, from the Office of Women's Health, to help you live healthier and have a productive conversation at your well-woman visit.

Every day, I will try to incorporate these lifestyle habits:

  • Eat healthy
  • Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity. Each week I will do aerobic activity and exercises to improve my balance and strengthen my muscles. I will talk to my doctor about any conditions that limit my ability to do regular physical activity.
  • Sleep for at least 7 to 8 hours per night
  • Reach and maintain a healthy weight
  • Get help to quit or not start smoking
  • Limit alcohol use to 1 drink or less
  • Not use illegal drugs or misuse prescription drugs
  • Wear a helmet when riding a bike and wear protective gear for sports
  • Wear a seat belt in cars and not text and drive
  • Protect my skin in the sun
I will talk to my health care provider at least once a year about:
  • My weight, height, diet, and physical activity level
  • Whether I use tobacco, alcohol, or drugs
  • Any violence in my life
  • Depression and any other mental health concerns
  • Who will make health care decisions for me if I am unable to
I will determine whether I'm at higher risk of or need tests, medicines, or vaccines for:
  • Low-dose aspirin
  • Blood pressure
  • Breast cancer prevention medicines
  • Cholesterol
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Flu
  • Hepatitis A, B, and C
  • HIV
  • Lung cancer (if I smoke now or have quit within the last 15 years)
  • Mammogram
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella (if born after 1956)
  • Meningitis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pap and HPV
  • Pneumonia
  • Shingles
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough
  • Tuberculosis
  • Urinary incontinence
photo courtesy of VisitNC.com

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