Hot Tips for Summer Skin

From Makeup Myths to the Best Diet for Your Skin, New Resource Guide Helps Women Beat the Summer Heat

Red Bank, NJ - The key to healthy skin lies beyond which soap you use. It depends on what you eat, whether you exercise, how much stress you are under and even the kind of environment in which you live and work. Summer is particularly harsh on skin. In a new resource guide, Women, Skin Health & Beauty, the not-for-profit National Women's Health Resource Center (NWHRC) offers these tips for helping your skin survive the harsh rays of summer:


  • Take advantage of all the summer fruits and vegetables and eat a varied and nutritious diet. Studies show that diets high in saturated fat, including meat, butter and full-fat dairy, as well as soft drinks, cakes and pastries increased the likelihood of skin wrinkling. Follow a diet high in vitamin A, E and C and essential fatty acids.

  • Don't forget to wash down your nutritious foods with a big glass of water. In fact, aim for at least eight to 10 glasses of water a day for optimum skin results.

  • Get out in the warm weather and exercise! Exercise flushes impurities out of your skin and promotes production of sebum, or oil, you skin's natural moisturizer and enhances blood flow to the skin.

  • Here's another reason to stop smoking...smoking constricts blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the skin. It also depletes levels of valuable antioxidant vitamins like vitamin A, increasing damage to the elasticity of the skin.

  • Of course, the greatest damage to your skin occurs from the ultraviolet rays of the sun. When it comes to sunscreen, the higher the SPF, the better. Few people use sunscreen the right way — apply a full ounce every couple of hours, more if you've been swimming or sweating.

  • Besides sunscreen, you'll need a hat, protective clothing and a time limit for your stay in the sun.

  • Think a tanning bed is safer than a beach tan? Think again. The reality is there's no safe thing as a safe tan. UVA rays in tanning booths not only inflict damage similar to sunlight, but they are up to 20 times more intense than natural sunlight.

  • There's a very strong mind/body connection that exists between our emotions and our skin health. The stress in your life turns up on your face. Relaxation techniques, biofeedback and breathing training can help you cope better with life stresses and reduce their effects on your skin.

In addition, Women, Skin Health & Beauty tackles the many myths circulating about the dangers of makeup and cosmetic ingredients, how to choose the right products for you, and resources. The guide also looks at skin health over the lifespan, including pregnancy, perimenopause and menopause.

For a free guide, consumers may call 1-877-986-9472 or visit fmxhosting.com/drupal635.

# # # #

The National Women's Health Resource Center (NWHRC) is the leading independent health information source for women. The non-profit organization develops and distributes up-to-date and objective women's health information based on the latest advances in medical research and practice. NWHRC believes all women should have access to the most trusted and reliable health information.

Contact: Amber McCracken
1-888-406-9472

ADVERTISEMENT

Black Women Turn to Midwives to Avoid COVID and ‘Feel Cared For’

Fear of the pandemic and historically poor outcomes for Black women giving birth in hospitals is fuelling a demand for home births.

Pregnancy & Postpartum

Menopause Goes Beyond Reproductive Issues

This change of life affects our health from head to toe; it's important to get educated and find the right health care provider.

Menopause & Aging Well