Midlife Minute: An Easier Way to Plan Your Plate

You may have noticed the demise of the old way of the government's system of illustrating what and how much we should be eating. Although there are some critics of the new system, I think its clarity and logic are far superior to the old approach. I personally found it both confusing and tough to relate to a pyramid (unless perhaps you were visiting or living in or around Egypt).

Part of the message: enjoy your food, but eat less of it. That's always been my way of thinking. Huge portions get so many of us into trouble. It's no surprise that obesity has climbed along with the growth of the amount of food served in most restaurants and (especially) fast-food joints.

Obesity is spotlighted as a critical public-health problem in the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. In addition to offering specific dietary recommendations, the guidelines offer strong evidence for weight-loss strategies like: focusing on the total number of calories consumed, monitoring your food intake by keeping track of what you eat; taking care when eating out by choosing smaller portions or lower-calorie options; practicing portion control at home; eating a nutrient-dense breakfast; and limiting screen time.

You might also want to read:
U.S. Serves Up New Nutrition Guidelines on 'MyPlate'
New Guidelines Put Focus on Vitamin D Deficiency


Subscribe to Midlife Matters by Email

ADVERTISEMENT

Healthy Women’s Chronic Pain Advisory Council

A Collective Authority Advocating for More Education, Research and Care

Programs

Ridding the World of Cervical Cancer

The World Health Organization has a plan to rid the entire planet of cervical cancer. Here's what you need to know about this commonly diagnosed disease.

Your Health