Health Tip: Alcohol Can Interact With Medications

HealthDay News


Here's a partial list of examples

(HealthDay News) -- Over-the-counter medications may seem safer because they don't require a prescription. But they can still interact badly when alcohol enters the mix.

The American Academy of Family Physicians mentions these popular medications that may have adverse effects if mixed with alcohol:

  • NSAID pain relievers, which may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding if taken while consuming as few as two alcoholic drink per week.
  • Acetaminophen, which may cause liver damage when taken with alcohol.
  • Some OTC antihistamines can make you drowsy when taken with alcohol.
  • Decongestants and cough medications that contain the cough suppressant dextromethorphan can increase drowsiness when taken with alcohol.
  • Herbal supplements, such as kava kava, St. John's wort or valerian root, may increase drowsiness if taken with alcohol.

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