Happy Spouse, Healthy You
Happy Spouse, Healthy You

Happy Spouse, Healthy You

Many studies have shown that a stable and happy marriage is good for the health of both partners, increasing longevity. But did you know that there's also a link between one spouse's happinessand the health of the other?

Sexual Health

HealthDay News


TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many studies have shown that a stable and happy marriage is good for the health of both partners, increasing longevity. But did you know that there's also a link between one spouse's happiness and the health of the other?

READ: Secrets to a Happy Marriage

Building on the idea that a happy person is often a healthy person, researchers from Michigan State University and the University of Chicago explored whether a happy outlook could positively affect relationships. After studying nearly 2,000 couples, they found that people with a happy spouse are more likely to report better health over time -- above and beyond their own happiness.

It may be that a happy spouse offers their partner more TLC than an unhappy one who is often focused more on his or her own needs. A happy partner, especially one who follows a healthy lifestyle including regular exercise and smart food choices, is more likely to motivate their spouse to follow their example and become healthier in the process. Also, a happy spouse is likely to place fewer demands on a partner, reducing the likelihood of unhealthy behaviors like drinking.

How can you create a happier environment within your relationship? It's easier than you might think. Showing affection fosters feelings of well-being. These can be physical demonstrations, like kisses and hugs and holding hands as you sit or walk, as well as verbal ones, such as a simple but heartfelt compliment. And who doesn't respond positively to hearing those three little words, "I love you"?

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

ADVERTISEMENT

Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Suspension – What This Means for You

The pause is due to reports of blood clotting in six people (out of 6.8 million doses) who have received the vaccine.

Prevention & Screenings

Syphilis Cases in California Drive a Record-Setting Year for STDs Nationwide

Dating apps and drug use are contributing factors, and the epidemic is reaching babies, too

Sexual Health

Women Are More Likely to Have Chronic Pain. We Should Know How Treatment Options Affect Them.

Our own Monica Mallampalli and Martha Nolan bring much-needed attention to the difficulties of living with chronic pain and the complexity of finding treatment options

Policy