The Best Way to Track Weight Loss

The Best Way to Track Weight Loss

If you're on a diet, a scale isn’t the only—or the best—way to track your progress. Try these tips for tracking weight loss.

Your Wellness

HealthDay News


TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News)—The scale can be your best friend—or your worst enemy—when you're on a diet.

But whether or not you like what you see, a scale isn't the only—or the best—way to track your progress. Rather than looking for a particular number on a scale, measure success in more meaningful ways.

Learn More: 10 Strategies for Weight-Loss Success

Changes in your body mass index, or BMI (a ratio of your weight and height), is one good indicator. Use an online calculator to plug in your stats. As your weight drops, you should see your BMI go down, too. Note that a normal BMI range is between 18.5 and 24.9, while 25 to 29.9 indicates overweight, and 30 or greater signals obesity.

Because a large waist circumference puts you at greater risk of diabetes, heart disease and other health problems, you can also chart your progress with a tape measure. Use it to track the inches around your chest, hips, thighs, calves and upper arms, as well as your middle.

Learn More: Belly Fat More Dangerous in Older Women Than Being Overweight

How your clothes fit is an easy way to know if you're dropping pounds. Grab a tight pair of pants from your closet and try them on every two weeks, noting any changes.

If you're still focused on using the scale, make your weight-loss expectations a realistic one-half to one pound a week, to avoid being discouraged by the number you see.

Also, keep in mind that Monday isn't the best day for a weigh-in. Because people tend to eat more on the weekends and less during the week, Friday morning is a better time to get on the scale.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

ADVERTISEMENT

After My Hysterectomy, I’m Living My Best Life

After living with the pain of fibroids for 17 years, treating them was the best gift I could give myself.

Real Women, Real Stories

Nurses and Doctors Sick With COVID Feel Pressured to Get Back to Work

Hospitals, clinics and other health care facilities have flouted that simple guidance, pressuring workers who contract COVID-19 to return to work sooner than public health standards suggest.

Your Care

The Back Surgery Innovation That Gave Me My Life Back

I was stunned and scared when my doctors told me I had suffered a vertebral compression fracture, but this procedure healed me.

Created With Support