The Astonishing Thing Messing With Your Child’s Sleep

Pregnancy & Postpartum

child sleeping


HealthDay News

(HealthDay News) -- Exposure to light helps regulate the body's clock, which can help prepare the body for sleep.

The National Sleep Foundation suggests how to regulate exposure to light and other methods designed to improve your child's sleep:

  • Keep the lights dim during the bedtime routine. Once the lights have been turned out, only use a night light to guide your child's way in case of a nighttime potty break.
  • Eliminate light sources, such as electronics, from your child's room. Make sure any night light in the room is kept dim.
  • Use room-darkening curtains or shades.
  • Expose children to plenty of light during the day, and keep nighttime hours dark.
  • Don't allow TVs, computers, phones, tablets, etc. in your child's room, and restrict screen time in the hours before bedtime.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Published: June 2014

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