High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure

Q:

Can you offer tips for maintaining a very low-sodium diet?

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Tips for Talking to Your Health Care Provider

by Pamela M. Peeke, MD, MPH

woman and doctorWe've talked a lot about all the things health care professionals do wrong when it comes to communicating health information. But what about you? What is your role in the relationship? Well, as with any relationship, health communication is a two-way street. I know that I rely on my patients to tell me about any confusion they may have, or about things they don't understand, just as much as I rely on them to tell me where it hurts.

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Q:

My partner and I both have diabetes and high blood pressure. I often don't feel sexually aroused (and certainly cannot climax), and he cannot hold an erection long enough to please me. Is there some type of sexual act or position that we can explore that will please us both?

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Women's Health Tips: High Blood Pressure: Talk about It!

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Author: HealthyWomen
Published by: National Women's Health Resource Center, Inc., January 2009

Understanding what high blood pressure is all about doesn't get much easier than this: Women's Health Tips: High Blood Pressure: Talk about it! This new 2-page tip sheet will help you have a Heart-to-Heart conversation with your health care professional about your blood pressure and your risk for heart disease. Order your copy now!


Some of our publications are available for free but we do charge shipping, handling and processing fees for orders of 3+ publications. Online orders are limited to a maximum quantity of 500. For requests exceeding 500 please email [email protected] or call toll-free at 877-986-9472.

Didn't find what you were looking for? Visit our Health Topics A-Z area for more information.

Take Time to Talk About High Blood Pressure: Heart-to-Heart

Author: HealthyWomen
Published by: National Women's Health Resource Center, Inc., January 2009

Take time to talk about high blood pressure: Heart-to-Heart. Learn blood pressure ranges and questions to ask your health care professional from this new, easy-to-read postcard. Take it with you to your next medical appointment. 


Some of our publications are available for free but we do charge shipping, handling and processing fees for orders of 3+ publications. Online orders are limited to a maximum quantity of 500. For requests exceeding 500 please email [email protected] or call toll-free at 877-986-9472.

Didn't find what you were looking for? Visit our Health Topics A-Z area for more information.

Passport to Good Health

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Author: HealthyWomen and American Association of Nurse Practitioners
Published by: National Women's Health Resource Center, Inc., December 2010

Keep your health information organized with HealthyWomen and AANP's Passport to Good Health—a compact health record-keeping tool. Containing blood pressure and cholesterol screening ranges, preventive health screening details and schedule, vaccination schedule, personal record-keeping grids and more, it's the perfect place to keep track of personal health information and screening results.


Some of our publications are available for free but we do charge shipping, handling and processing fees for orders of 3+ publications. Online orders are limited to a maximum quantity of 500. For requests exceeding 500 please email [email protected] or call toll-free at 877-986-9472.

Didn't find what you were looking for? Visit our Health Topics A-Z area for more information.

Coping With Heart Disease

by Pamela M. Peeke, MD, MPH

woman with groceriesIf you've had a heart attack, a stroke, or even just been diagnosed with some form of cardiovascular disease, you're probably reeling with shock and filled with questions. How will this change my life? What does this mean for my family? Am I going to die?

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Who's Who for Treating High Blood Pressure

group of doctorsHow well is your health care professional doing at helping you manage your high blood pressure? According to the studies, not too well. Physicians tend to significantly overestimate how well their patients manage their high blood pressure; wait too long to recommend medication (and even then often don't prescribe it according to national guidelines); and suggest lifestyle changes to fewer than half their patients with high blood pressure.

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Medications to Treat High Blood Pressure

dictionaryEven if you make all recommended lifestyle changes to reduce your blood pressure, it may remain high (although not as high as if you didn't make any changes!). That's when medication is needed. There are currently seven primary classes of blood pressure lowering medications, as shown below. You may need to take more than one drug. Studies find that most people with hypertension need at least two medications to bring their blood pressure into line.

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