Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar Disorder

Want a fast, simple, healthy snack that satisfies your craving for crunch?

Want a fast, simple, healthy snack that satisfies your craving for crunch? Toss 1/3 cup popcorn kernels into a paper lunch sack, fold down the end twice, and microwave the bag for about 90 seconds. Sprinkle with your favorite low-salt seasoning and you've got a terrific low-cal snack.

Getting enough vitamin C?

Getting enough vitamin C? For most women, your recommended daily intake is 75 mg. You don't have to rely on OJ for all your vitamin C; other fruits like guava, mango and strawberry are loaded with it, as are veggies like broccoli, bell peppers and kohlrabi.

Chocolate is your friend

Chocolate is your friend. That's right, chocolate - in some forms - is good for your heart, according to researchers. Dark chocolate, in particular, is loaded with antioxidants that help reduce blood pressure. But don't go overboard: a healthy daily amount is about the size of a Hershey's kiss.

Grow your own herbs

Grow your own herbs. You can really perk up your menu (and cut back on the salt) with the addition of fresh herbs to favorite meals with pasta, poultry and seafood. From the smallest countertop planter to the biggest backyard garden, a fresh stock of herbs will help you prepare healthy and tasty meals year-round.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common, and often very treatable with simple dietary changes

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common, and often very treatable with simple dietary changes. Start by avoiding eating anything a few hours before bedtime, and reducing or ceasing your consumption of chocolate, alcohol, spices, fried foods and tobacco products. (Your health care professional can offer a more detailed list of dietary dos and don'ts.)

Variety is essential to sticking with healthy snacking

Variety is essential to sticking with healthy snacking. At work, stock a drawer with fat-free microwave popcorn, small portions of almonds or walnuts, and dried fruit like cranberries or cherries. At home, keep a bowl of fresh fruit handy and pre-cut carrots, peppers, cucumbers or other favorites in the fridge. Happy munching!

What's in season?

What's in season? Eating foods that are plentiful naturally is healthier (and less expensive) than sticking with the same thing year-round, and seasonally available food is often most flavorful and colorful. So go ahead: try some new vegetables, fruits, herbs or seafood this season.

For most women, nutritionists recommend three cups of milk a day

For most women, nutritionists recommend three cups of milk a day. But getting the calcium you need doesn't need to be boring: try including a cup of low-fat vanilla yogurt in a fruit shake, adding feta cheese crumbles to a salad, or enjoying a warm cup of hot chocolate in the afternoon as a snack.

Frozen prepared meals are expensive - and often loaded with salt and preservatives

Frozen prepared meals are expensive - and often loaded with salt and preservatives. But you can still fill your freezer with healthy frozen meals: make Sunday slow-cooker day and prepare one of your favorites, then divide it into individual servings and freeze them. You'll save money while eating healthy home-cooked meals.

Tips for Talking to Your Health Care Provider

by Pamela M. Peeke, MD, MPH

woman and doctorWe've talked a lot about all the things health care professionals do wrong when it comes to communicating health information. But what about you? What is your role in the relationship? Well, as with any relationship, health communication is a two-way street. I know that I rely on my patients to tell me about any confusion they may have, or about things they don't understand, just as much as I rely on them to tell me where it hurts.

Continue Reading